This week I organised a workshop with Paul Clifford, expert in digital creativity, open source hardware and learning differently. It was the first workshop in a series on cultural, institutional innovation. We built keyboards out of fruit, a dance-machine with post-its and a robot that made Pollockian drawings. In the wrap-up, one of the participants mentioned he found that hands-on workshops like these are a great tool to talk about

Of the 17 books I’ve read in 2015 so far, I scored seven with 5 stars. Of the past seven, six. Only Ashlee Vance’s thorough biography of Elon Musk missed a few eloquent eye-openers to reach the level of 5-star biographies. Lawrence in Arabia, Scott Anderson’s biography of T.E. Lawrence, did score 5 stars. H is for Hawk, Helen Macdonald’s profound autobiography, deserved 6. Perhaps slightly biased, I also gave

The Consumer (Decision) Journey is a framework that explains how people make decisions about products and services in a world where they are constantly exposed to a multitude of media channels. There are many variations to the framework, and companies like Google and Forrester use it in slightly different ways to explain the same thing: people don’t (just) buy whatever you have to offer because you’re able to buy most