The Consumer (Decision) Journey is a framework that explains how people make decisions about products and services in a world where they are constantly exposed to a multitude of media channels. There are many variations to the framework, and companies like Google and Forrester use it in slightly different ways to explain the same thing: people don’t (just) buy whatever you have to offer because you’re able to buy most TV ads; their decisions are based on the interplay of many channels and marketing messages.

That’s the theory. In practice, the consumer journey is mostly a really useful tool to think about audiences. To introduce the tool, some of its core concepts and the idea of consumer centered marketing, over the past months I’ve developed the Consumer Journey Boardgame, a game in which you ‘Dominate the media channels, convince consumers, always [are] closing and crush the competition’ as the rule book reads.

I developed the game drawing inspiration from my work for Philips and the Consumer Journey concept as presented by McKinsey.

The objective of the game is to complete 3 purchases. To do so, you have to convince consumers of your brand, engage them and make them loyal by spending your marketing budget wisely. But consumers are fickle and quickly change their preference, so you’ll have to use your business acumen to succeed. In an atmosphere of unforgiving competition you’ll have to use specials such as big data and consumer insights to gain a competitive advantage.

I’ve been developing games and game-like environments for most of my life, but the last physical board game must have been 25 years ago (Crocodile Adventures, I recently found the box). A lot has changed since then, such as that I can now buy a logo on Fiverr and use an algorithm to help me balance the gameplay.

Apart from such digital luxuries, most of the game is made by hand, in a limited edition of 50 copies. I didn’t develop the game as a product, but if you want one to play with the concept of the consumer journey in your organization, email me. They cost about 50 euros to make.

Alternatively, you can enjoy the photos or find me at any of the conferences I’ll be speaking at in the coming months to try to beat me at my own game!

  • Alex Hantson

    Very interesting concept! Is there a video of the gameplay ?

    • http://themuseumofthefuture.com/ Jasper Visser

      Thanks Alex! There are only the photos, but imagine people rolling dice and playing chips:-)